On A Scale of 1 to 5: Research Logs

Conversation with Her Maternal Grandfather

EXPERIENCE, PLACE, PERSON, ACTIVITY: Article in Yes! Magazine (sent by Dr. Gayles)

Click link to: “What We Can Learn About Resilience from Indigenous Leaders”

Log Inspired by my Indigenous Friends.
DESCRIPTION: This article is about the resiliency of indigenous people. They have been fighting a similar battle since colonists came to the new world. The article gives tips to people for resilience, such as practicing collectivism, staying connected, protecting the vulnerable, and finding goodness within the bad times.

EVALUATION/CIRCLE
On a scale of 1 to 5, with 5 being most significant, how you would rate the importance of this place/person/activity to your understanding of age studies during the Coronavirus.

5

This article is important to my understanding of age studies during the Coronavirus Pandemic because it is about a community who is typically forgotten and marginalized within the United States. But even though they are forgotten, they have survived in spite of all the odds. If we followed the tips set out by indigenous people, the method in which the pandemic has been unfolding could have been different, and maybe more people would have survived.

The section about protecting the vulnerable focuses on elders, who are more susceptible to effects of the virus. It is a call to action to everyone to check in on elders, bring them groceries, and make sure they are doing alright. I will be sure to do this!

EXPERIENCE, PLACE, PERSON, ACTIVITY: Article in the New York Times “Restarting America Means People Will Die. So When Do We Do It”. Log was inspired by a conversation with my grandfather.

CREATIVE TITLE: How Many People Are We Willing to Kill for the Economy?

DESCRIPTION: This article is an early take on the possibility of reopening various states. It outlines (hopefully) a proper way to reopen states. A panel of five people–which includes a reverend, various college officials, a journalist, and former government officials–discusses trade-offs for reopening the economy, what in the economy should reopen first, and long-projections of how the pandemic will change America.

EVALUATION/CIRCLE On a scale of 1 to 5, with 5 being most significant, how you would rate the importance of this place/person/activity to your understanding of age studies during the Coronavirus Pandemic, April 2020.

5

This article is important to my understanding of age studies during the Coronavirus Pandemic because it shows the focus America’s focus on profit rather than on people. Georgia has recently announced reopening, which means more people, specifically more elders, will be exposed to the virus. Unfortunately, some of these people will probably die. And the government officials do not care because they do not want to pay people for unemployment.

The conversation my grandfather and I had about this article and the NPR article from Log 2 focused on the heightened sense of social activism his generation had because of the Civil Rights Movement. He thinks that this could bring a similar sense of activism to our generation. I am not sure if I agree with him, because many people think that being socially competent on social media is enough. What we really need to create change is direct action, lobbying, pressure on our officials, or a revolution. We could achieve this through grassroots organizing. I believe we can do this through social media if we work hard enough.

Click link to: “What Coronavirus Exposes About America’s Political Divide” / Source: National Public Radio

CREATIVE TITLE: Things People of Color Knew Already, but White People Are Just Finding Out

DESCRIPTION: This article discusses the political divide in America that is being “brought to the surface” by the coronavirus. Main idea is that people of color are “socially predisposed” to the virus because of multigenerational living situations, densely packed areas, and work arrangements. Not only does the article highlight these challenges, it also explains why racial attitudes support the thinking that the virus is “someone else’s problem”.

EVALUATION/CIRCLE

On a scale of 1 to 5, with 5 being most significant, how you would rate the importance of this place/person/activity to your understanding of age studies during the Coronavirus Pandemic, April 2020.

5

Article references the U.S. Surgeon General’s comments on multigenerational living and its effects on people of color. This information is important to SIS discourse on ageism. It reinforces my understanding that seeing concern for elders as ““someone else’s problem” can lead to ageist behavior.